Nintendo Switch Dead Pixels are Not a ‘Defect’ Says Nintendo


Nintendo Switch owners are being told that issues with ‘dead pixels’ on the console’s tablet screen are not a flaw with the hardware. In the console’s official FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions), Nintendo explains that “small numbers of stuck or dead pixels are a characteristic of LED screens” such as those on the Switch’s tablet. As such, Nintendo deems dead pixels “normal” and tells concerned players that this “should not be considered a defect.”

Since the console launched last week, players across the globe have reported that their Switch systems came with dead pixels, meaning that the device’s portable tablet is unable to display anything in small parts of the screen. Some of the pixels are at the edge of the screen and therefore don’t cause too much of a distraction, but some players say that dead pixels have showed up right in the middle, making games such as The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild a challenge to play on the go.

While a dead pixel does not completely ruin the Nintendo Switch experience, it certainly puts a damper on it. It’s also especially frustrating as this does not seem to be the only problem that fans have with the game’s hardware. Reports of a Nintendo Switch blue screen of death problem have cropped up while some are also facing connectivity issues with the Joy-Con controllers. Disgruntled players are asking why Nintendo was unable to address or check for these sorts of problems prior to the console’s launch.

The official response from Nintendo is also vexing, as it leaves affected players unsure of what to do. As Nintendo doesn’t see the dead pixels as a problem, does this mean that the company is unwilling to offer replacement Switch consoles, even if there are multiple clumps of dead pixels on the screen?

As some have noted, when the Nintendo DS was affected by the same issue because of its LED screens, Nintendo did not offer replacements, but Switch owners are hoping that maybe this will be different.

Unfortunately it’s unclear how Nintendo will address the issue. After all, the Switch did just set sales records so Nintendo may not see that there’s an incentive to sort the problem so long as the console is flying off of store shelves.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *